Olde Village Realty LLC - Olde Village Realty LLC | Brimfield, MA Real Estate, Holland, MA


As a home seller, you need to do everything possible to learn about the competition. By doing so, you can find out what sets your house apart from other available residences and promote your home accordingly.

Ultimately, gaining a competitive advantage over rival home sellers can be simple – here are three tips to help you do just that.

1. Become a Real Estate Market Expert

Allocate the necessary time and resources to analyze the real estate market closely – you'll be happy you did. With housing market insights at your disposal, you can map out a successful home selling journey.

Take a look at the prices of homes that are currently available in your city or town. Focus on houses that are similar to your own, and you can establish a price range for your residence.

Also, examine the prices of recently sold houses in your area. This will allow you to see how long it took for these residences to sell. Plus, you can find out whether you're about to enter a buyer's or seller's market.

2. Learn About Your Home's Condition

Conduct a home appraisal, and you can gain unparalleled insights into your house's condition.

A home appraisal usually takes just a few hours to complete. During this appraisal, a property inspector will examine your residence and identify any home problems. Then, the inspector will offer a report that outlines his or her findings.

Following a home appraisal, you can determine the true condition of your house. That way, you can prioritize various home improvements and ensure that your home's condition serves as a key differentiator after you list your residence.

3. Work with a Real Estate Agent

If you're unsure about how to approach a competitive real estate market, there is no need to worry. Many real estate agents are available to assist home sellers and provide these sellers with extensive support throughout the home selling journey.

A real estate agent can offer tips to help a home seller bolster a house's interior and exterior. This housing market professional understands what it takes to promote a residence to the right groups of homebuyers too. Thus, he or she will do everything possible to guarantee your residence stands out from the competition.

Perhaps best of all, no question is too big or too small for a real estate agent. If you want to know the prices of recently sold houses in your neighborhood, a real estate agent can provide you with the pricing data that you need. Or, if you want to enhance your home's interior, a real estate agent is happy to help you discover the best ways to transform your house's interior from drab to dazzling.

Competition is fierce among home sellers. But with the aforementioned tips, a home seller can gain a competitive edge, one that can help this seller accelerate the home selling journey and get the best price for his or her house.


If you plan to sell your home, it may be helpful to prepare for a difficult negotiation with a homebuyer.

Although your home may be in great shape and you've set a fair price for it, there are no guarantees that you'll be able to avoid a long, complex home selling negotiation. However, a home seller who prepares for a difficult negotiation now may be better equipped than others to remain calm, cool and collected throughout the home selling journey.

Now, let's take a look at three tips that home sellers can use to get ready for a difficult negotiation.

1. Assess the Housing Market Closely

A home seller who sets a competitive price for his or her residence may be able to avoid a complicated home selling negotiation entirely.

To determine a fair price for your house, a property appraisal is ideal. During this appraisal, a property inspector will evaluate your home's interior and exterior and help you identify any problem areas. Then, you can complete assorted home improvement projects and price your house accordingly.

Furthermore, it is important to assess the prices of comparable houses in your area. With this housing market information at your disposal, you can enter a home selling negotiation with data to support your arguments.

2. Understand Your Home Selling Goals

How a home seller approaches a negotiation may vary based on his or her goals.

For example, a home seller who needs to move out of a house as soon as possible may be willing to go above and beyond the call of duty to satisfy a property buyer's requests. By doing so, this home seller can speed up the property selling cycle.

On the other hand, a home seller who can afford to be patient may be unwilling to budge on various homebuyer requests.

Consider your home selling goals closely before you enter a negotiation with a homebuyer. And if you feel uncomfortable, you can always walk away from a negotiation and reenter the housing market.

3. Focus on the End Results

A home selling negotiation can become contentious, but it is important to remember the end goals of this negotiation.

Ultimately, a successful negotiation will meet the needs of both a property seller and buyer. If a negotiation heavily favors a homebuyer, a home seller should be ready to exit the negotiation.

A home selling negotiation can be stressful, and you should be ready to take breaks as needed. For example, spending a few minutes meditating or walking outdoors may help you clear your head and reenter a home selling negotiation with a fresh perspective.

Lastly, if you want additional support, real estate agents are happy to help you. A real estate agent knows what it takes to negotiate with homebuyers and will do everything possible to ensure all parties involved in a negotiation get the best results.

Take the guesswork out of a home selling negotiation – use these tips, and you can prepare for a difficult negotiation before you add your house to the real estate market.


Have you ever watched a home television show and found yourself admiring the size of a kitchen? It’s easy to get drawn to tall, wide cherry wood kitchen cabinets, the type of cabinets that go from just below the ceiling to a foot above the kitchen sink. Before you know it, you’re actually counting the cabinets. You may also start to wish that your home had those very same kitchen cabinets.

Then, there’s the trendy kitchen island, stylish marble designs adding a welcomed décor to a kitchen. Wide bay windows bring in lots of natural sunlight. Rare ceramic or tile floor colors and designs truly set a kitchen apart, as do spacious pantries that are hidden behind a simple kitchen door.

These habits could make you hate your kitchen

Keep watching those home television shows and you might miss a lot of good in your house. You might start creating a mental list of “what I wish I had in my house” items. One of those items could quickly become the wish for a larger kitchen. But, a larger kitchen may not solve your space and design wants.

Certain personal habits could make a large kitchen too small for you. What you do regularly in your kitchen could also tarnish the appeal of the room. Among those habits are:

  • Not taking full advantage of the existing storage space in your kitchen – Loosely stack pots, pans, kitchen utensils and food boxes in your kitchen and you could lose a quarter of the space in your kitchen cabinets.
  • Using your kitchen pantry as a place to store your washer and dryer – In addition to making your kitchen feel too small, if you put your washer and dryer in your pantry, your kitchen could feel too hot and stuffy during spring and summer months.
  • Leaving expired or outdated canned foods in cabinets and cupboards
  • Using your kitchen counters as a storage area for automotive, household cleaning and reading products
  • Piling dirty or recently washed laundry on kitchen counters or on the floor in kitchen corners
  • Allowing pets to turn your kitchen into a play area
  • Limiting your dining room to a place that you only use during major holidays

Wide, open kitchen floor space gives you more room to cook, especially if you love to cook from scratch, using plenty of earth grown seasonings, spices and grains. This space can seem hard to come by if your house has a small kitchen. Yet, moving may not completely solve your kitchen space challenges, especially if you fill empty space at your house with decorations, boxes and clutter.

Do this and even a bigger kitchen may feel too small. Similar to how people who live in small homes learn to make the most of each square foot of space at their residence, train yourself to value and get the most from your entire kitchen. Make smart kitchen storage decisions. Prepare meals in your dining room and cook them in the kitchen. By not limiting cooking to your kitchen, you can see how your current kitchen can meet all of your food preparation needs.


There are several undeniable benefits to having an occasional garage sale on your property, but there's a lot more to it than just setting out a few unwanted items in your driveway and raking in the cash. If you're an entrepreneur at heart, then holding a garage sale should be second nature to you. Good organizational skills and a basic knowledge of advertising is helpful, as is the ability to do a little friendly negotiating. By adopting the mindset of a small business owner, you'll tend to be more effective in dealing with the many details of planning and running a garage sale. From putting up signage and doing advertising to handling customer relations and merchandising, knowing the basics of business marketing will definitely be to your advantage. If you've never held a yard sale before -- or if you could use a quick refresher course -- here are few helpful tips:
  1. Cost-effective advertising: While cheap classified ads can help draw a bevy of eager bargain hunters to your home, you can also get a lot of mileage out of free forms of advertising. Garage sale signs, which can be purchased cheaply at any hardware store, can attract dozens of potential customers. In addition to posting a sign directly in from of your house, other good spots are nearby intersections and street corners. Handmade signs can sometimes work, but they have to legible, easy to read, and rigid enough to resist wind and moisture. Other free methods of advertising include flyers, posting announcements on social media, and taking out free ads on Craigslist.
  2. Preparation and presentation: When the day of your garage sale arrives, you need to be organized, prepared, and ready to welcome your first customers early in the morning. Publicizing the hours of your sales event is a necessary part of the planning process, but don't be surprised if you see a few cars starting to pull up before you've finished carrying all your items out to your driveway. Garage sales always attract hard-core bargain hunters who do not want to miss a single item. In all likelihood, the first few hours will be the busiest, and attendance will probably drop off in the afternoon. As far as preparation, getting all your items set aside and labeled (priced) the night before will help avoid last-minute stress, awkward delays in getting started, lost sales, and impatient customers. Display tables are optional, but will make it easier for people to browse your sale items.
  3. Time investment: While some families devote the entire day -- or even the whole weekend -- to their garage sale, others limit the event to four hours on a Saturday or Sunday morning. A lot depends on your patience, how fast your items get sold, and whether you have any plans for the afternoon. At a certain point, you'll start noticing diminishing returns on your time, so you might decide to wrap things up and count your money around noon.
Holding a yard sale can be a great way to make some extra money and get rid of household clutter, but be prepared to devote time and energy to the event -- before, during, and after. Mother Nature can also be a factor in the timing of a garage sale, so keep an eye on the forecasts and reschedule if the weather doesn't cooperate.

For better or for worse, the kitchen is the most fragrant area of the house. It’s where we cook and store our food, but it’s also where we throw away our garbage.

 In this winter months, people do most of their cooking indoors, which can lead to an increase in grease splatter. In the summer, the high temperatures in the kitchen can cause garbage to smell and fruit to become overripe more quickly.

 Regardless of the time of year, we can all use some help when it comes to reducing kitchen odors. In this article, we’ll give you some advice on how to do just that.

 Read on for tips on eliminating odors in your kitchen.

Air quality

The odors in your kitchen, both the good and the bad, come in the form of tiny particles floating in the air. So, it follows that one of the ways to remove lingering odors would be to remove them from the air in your kitchen.

One way to do this is with the use of an air purifier. These appliances come in a number of different sizes and can vary in price from under $100 to several hundreds of dollars. Depending on the size and layout of your home, you’ll want to search for a purifier that can safely handle the number of square feet that you’ll need to purify.

One benefit of using an air purifier is that it can also help you remove dust and other allergies from the air while removing unpleasant odors. However, keep in mind that most air purifiers run 24/7, so expect a few extra dollars added to your electric bill each month.

Cooking surfaces

One of the most common causes of kitchen odors are the surfaces of your counters, oven, and appliances. There are a few ways to handle this problem, but the best solution is to take preemptive measures.

When cooking items with grease, oil or butter, use a splatter screen. This will help you keep most of the grease inside the pan and off your surfaces where they will later emit a smell.

It’s important to frequently wipe down surfaces in your kitchen and clean them with a degreaser. If you don’t have kitchen tile or some other form of easy to clean surface around your cooking surfaces, consider installing one.

Dishes and garbage

We get it, after working all day, cooking dinner, and finally sitting down to relax no one wants to clean dishes. However, leaving dishes in the sink is one of the leading causes of kitchen odors. This is also true for people who don’t run their dishwasher frequently.

Speaking of dishwashers, be sure to check the drain at the bottom for debris, which can cause your dishwasher to smell badly.

When it comes to garbage, it’s often better to have a small garbage can that you empty more frequently than a larger one that will start to smell. Try to find a smaller can that has a cover, and consider scented bags to help mask any odors that do find their way out of the garbage can.




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